Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Brachytherapy

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_699-2

Synonyms

Definition

Brachytheapy treatments deliver radiation dose using radioactive isotopes placed via applicator devices or catheters directly into tumors or into cavities in close approximation to the tumor.

Characteristics

Radiation therapy is the treatment of cancer with radiation. Radiation targets the DNA in cells and causes DNA strand breaks. Normal cells have the ability to repair the DNA damage, whereas cancer cells lack such repair mechanisms.

Brachytherapy is one method of delivering radiation. The word “brachy” is derived from Greek meaning “short.” The radiation from the radioactive isotopes penetrates a short distance, allowing for conformity to a target volume or tumor while sparing the normal structures in the vicinity. The dose falloff for a single brachythrapy source follows the inverse square law, in that the distance traveled by the radiation is inversely proportional to the square of the radius of distance (d = 1/r2).

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Keywords

Endometrial Cancer External Beam Radiation High Dose Rate High Dose Rate Brachytherapy Intracavitary Radiation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Aronowitz JN (2015) Afterloading: the technique that rescued brachytherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 92(3):479–487PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Lee KK, Lee JY, Nam JM, Kim CB, Park KR (2015) High-dose rate vs. low-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: systematic review and meta-analysis. Brachytherapy 14(4):449–457PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Lukens JN, Gamez M, Hu K, Harrison LB (2014) Modern brachytherapy. Semin Oncol 41(6):831–847PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. WE-F-201-00 (2015) Practical guidelines for commissioning advanced brachytherapy dose calculation algorithms. Med Phys 42(6):3686Google Scholar
  5. Williamson JF (2006) Brachytherapy technology and physics since 1950: a half century of progress. Phys Med Biol 51(13):R303–R325PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Dose fall-off. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1154. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1712Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Dose homogeneity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1155. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1713Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Dose rate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1155. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1715Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Dwell positions. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1173. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1755Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Half-life. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1625. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2554Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Isodose. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1917. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3156Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Radiobiology. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3147. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4915Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BC Cancer AgencyVancouver Island CentreVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Brigham and Women’s/Dana-Farber Cancer CenterBostonUSA