Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Ovarian Cancer Chemotherapy

  • Heidi J. Gray
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6972-2

Definition

Ovarian cancer is the second most common gynecologic malignancy in the USA with around 22,000 women diagnosed per year. As most patients are diagnosed with advanced stage disease, ovarian cancer is also the deadliest gynecologic malignancy with over 15,000 deaths per year. Standard first-line treatment is surgical staging, including debulking of tumor with the goal of removal of all gross disease followed by chemotherapy for patients with advanced stage (6–8 cycles) or high risk early stage disease (3–6 cycles). Improvements in surgical techniques as well as of chemotherapies have led to significant improvement in the 5-year overall survival rate from 35 % in the 1970s to 45 % in the 1990s.

Characteristics

First-Line Chemotherapy

Many classes of chemotherapeutic drugs are active in treatment of epithelial ovarian cancer. The first drugs to show activity were the alkylating agents, such as cyclophosphamide and melphalan. Multiagent therapy with doxorubicin then cisplatinwas...

Keywords

Ovarian Cancer Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Advanced Stage Disease Advanced Ovarian Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Alberts DS, Liu PY, Hannigan EV et al (1996) Intraperitoneal cisplatin plus intravenous cyclophosphamide versus intravenous cisplatin plus intravenous cyclophosphamide for stage III ovarian cancer. N Engl J Med 335(26):1950–1955CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Armstrong DK, Bundy B, Wenzel L et al (2006) Intraperitoneal cisplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. N Engl J Med 354(1):34–43CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. International Collaborative Ovarian Neoplasm Group (2002) Paclitaxel plus carboplatin versus standard chemotherapy with either single-agent carboplatin or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin in women with ovarian cancer: the ICON3 randomised trial. Lancet 360(9332):505–515Google Scholar
  4. Katsumata N, Yasuda M, Takahashi F et al (2009) Dose-dense paclitaxel once a week in combination with carboplatin every 3 weeks for advanced ovarian cancer: a phase 3, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet 374(9698):1331–1338CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Markman M, Bundy BN, Alberts DS et al (2001) Phase III trial of standard-dose intravenous cisplatin plus paclitaxel versus moderately high-dose carboplatin followed by intravenous paclitaxel and intraperitoneal cisplatin in small-volume stage III ovarian carcinoma: an intergroup study of the Gynecologic Oncology Group, Southwestern Oncology Group, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group. J Clin Oncol 19(4):1001–1007PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. McGuire WP, Hoskins WJ, Brady MF et al (1996) Cyclophosphamide and cisplatin compared with paclitaxel and cisplatin in patients with stage III and stage IV ovarian cancer. N Engl J Med 334(1):1–6CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Muggia FM, Braly PS, Brady MF et al (2000) Phase III randomized study of cisplatin versus paclitaxel versus cisplatin and paclitaxel in patients with suboptimal stage III or IV ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study. J Clin Oncol 18(1):106–115PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Ozols RF, Bundy BN, Greer BE et al (2003) Phase III trial of carboplatin and paclitaxel compared with cisplatin and paclitaxel in patients with optimally resected stage III ovarian cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group Study. J Clin Oncol 21(17):3194–3200CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Piccart MJ, Bertelsen K, James K et al (2000) Randomized intergroup trial of cisplatin-paclitaxel versus cisplatin-cyclophosphamide in women with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer: three-year results. J Natl Cancer Inst 92(9):699–708CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Doxorubicin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1159. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1722Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1292. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6952Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Melphalan. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2221. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3619Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Overall Survival. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2727. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6961Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Progression-Free Survival. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3001. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6496Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Surgical Debulking. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3575. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5598Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Taxane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3614. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5689Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Topotecan. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3730. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6948Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gynecologic OncologyUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA