Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Bone Tropism

  • Alessandro Fatatis
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_688-2

Synonyms

Definition

Bone tropism is the propensity of certain tumors to spread from the organ(s) in which they initially originated and target preferentially the skeleton, in which they may eventually grow into secondary tumors or metastasis.

Characteristics

Solid tumors at their initial stage present unique challenges for the selection of the appropriate treatment. Several considerations come into play, including the feasibility of their surgical ablation, the age of the patient, and the histological grade of the neoplasia, among others. However, the risk of metastatic spread is indeed one of the most critical factors in deciding the therapeutic strategy to adopt. It is also widely recognized that the detection of secondary tumors at the time of the initial diagnosis poses additional and most often prohibitive hurdles to a positive clinical outcome. This is because after secondary tumors become clinically evident there is no...

Keywords

Cancer Cell Secondary Tumor Skeletal Metastasis Bone Microenvironment Metastatic Growth 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Chambers AF, Groom AC, MacDonald IC (2003) Dissemination and growth of cancer cells in metastatic sites. Nat Rev Cancer 2:563–572CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fidler IJ (2003) The pathogenesis of cancer metastasis: the “seed and soil” hypothesis revisited. Nat Rev Cancer 3:453–458CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Loberg RD, Gayed BA, Olson KB et al (2005) A paradigm for the treatment of prostate cancer bone metastases based on an understanding of tumor cell-microenvironment interactions. J Cell Biochem 96:439–446CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) CX3CL1/fractalkine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1022. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1417Google Scholar
  2. (2012) CX3CR1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1022. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1418Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Extravasation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1370. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2080Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Integrin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1884. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3084Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Intravasation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1901. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3125Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Osteomimicry. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2663. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4283Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Osteoprotegerin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2667. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4288Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Selectins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3355. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5218Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Transforming growth factor alpha. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3758. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5915Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and PhysiologyDrexel University College of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA