Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Prostate Cancer Targeted Therapy

  • Benyi Li
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6826-2

Definition

Targeted therapy represents an attractive option for cancer patients. It is designed specifically to target the hallmark or active pathway of cancer cells without toxicity to normal cells, through which the patients can be expected to benefit from improved outcomes with minimized treatment related side effects.

Characteristics

Prostate cancer is the leading type of cancer and second leading cause of cancer related death among men in Western world. Initially, the conventional treatment involving androgen deprivation therapy alleviates the disease temporarily but eventually results in recurrence of highly aggressive and castration-resistant metastatic cancer, for which no curative therapy exists currently. Thus, there is an urgent need for new therapeutic approaches to be developed for patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

In the last decade, much has been learned about molecular pathways and biological mechanisms of prostate cancer progression and this provides...

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Androgen Receptor Advanced Prostate Cancer Androgen Receptor Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) AKT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 115. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_163Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Basic fibroblast Growth Factor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 349. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_539Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Estramustine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1327. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2013Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Monoclonal Antibody. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2367. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6842Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Monoclonal Antibody Therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2367–2368. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3823Google Scholar
  6. (2012) MTOR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2384. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3867Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Prostatic Acid Phosphatase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3072. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6777Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Renal cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 3225–3226. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6575Google Scholar
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  10. (2012) Sunitinib. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3562. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5575Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Targeted Therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3610. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5677Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Transcription. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3752. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5899Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of UrologyThe University of Kansas Medical CenterKansas CityUSA