Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Prostate Cancer Radionuclide Imaging

  • Yiyan Liu
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6795-3

Definition

The main goal for prostate cancer imaging is to achieve a more accurate disease characterization with anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging modalities. Compared to conventional radiographic studies, radionuclide imaging provides complementary information about both function and metabolism of tumor cells. Today, a variety of radionuclide imaging probes and techniques are in clinical trials.

Characteristics

During the last decade, there has been a significant advancement in imaging of prostate cancer. Conventional imaging, which includes ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is currently used to detect organ-confined or metastatic disease for staging of tumorsand determining prognosis. Today, the major goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization with anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging modalities. Since prostate cancer is clinically a heterogeneous disease characterized by biologic behavior...

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Single Photon Emission Compute Tomography Sentinel Lymph Node Androgen Receptor Positron Emission Tomography Imaging 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of RadiologyNew Jersey Medical School, Rutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA