Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Metastatic Breast Cancer Experimental Therapeutics

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6794-2

Synonyms

Definition

Experimental therapies for metastatic breast cancer can be defined as novel interventions directed toward the more effective treatment of secondary, progressively growing tumors distant from the primary site of the breast. Experimental therapies may include newly developed drug agents or may be different modalities for existing agents, such as the novel indication of a drug in the setting of breast cancer or the combination of approved single agents.

Characteristics

Breast cancer affects one in four women and is the second leading cause of cancer mortality among women in the United States. Globally, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Approximately 1 % of all cases of breast cancer occur in men. The majority of mortality associated with the disease is due to the advanced, metastatic form of breast cancer, characterized by progressively growing tumors distant from the...

Keywords

Obesity Adenocarcinoma Paclitaxel Progesterone Cyclophosphamide 
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References

  1. Cardoso F, Castiglione M (2009) Locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer: ESMO clinical recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Ann Oncol 20(Suppl 4):15–18PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Kataja V, Castiglione M (2009) Primary breast cancer: ESMO clinical recommendations for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up. Ann Oncol 20(Suppl 4):10–14PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Tkaczuk KH (2009) Review of the contemporary cytotoxic and biologic combinations available for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Clin Ther 31(Pt 2):2273–2289CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Wong ST (2009) Emerging treatment combinations: integrating therapy into clinical practice. Am J Health Syst Pharm 66:S9–S14CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Adjuvant. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 75. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_107Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Allogeneic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 138. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_194Google Scholar
  3. (2012) EGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1824Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Exemestane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1357. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6752Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Interleukin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1892. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3094Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Lapatinib. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1980. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3277Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Monoclonal Antibody. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2367. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6842Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Proliferation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3004. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4766Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Progesterone Receptor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2990. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4754Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Sunitinib. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3562. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5575Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Vaccine Therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3879. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6147Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ocular Molecular Genetics InstituteHarvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear InfirmaryBostonUSA