Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Breast Cancer Immunotherapy

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6630-2

Definition

Active specific immunmotherapy (immunotherapy) of cancer endeavors to direct the host’s own immune system against an antigen expressed by tumor cells to create an immune response that will destroy the established tumor. The same immune response induced in an adjuvant setting targets and intends to eliminate isolated disseminated tumor cells (micrometastasis) to prevent disease recurrence and to create a state of immune surveillance (immune surveillance of tumors) that will eliminate tumor cells as they arise. Passive immunotherapy uses monoclonal antibodies (MAbs; monoclonal antibody therapy) Monoclonal Antibodies for Cancer Therapy that bind to receptors or antigens on the tumor cell surface blocking receptor-ligand interactions and recruiting immune effector cells against the tumor. Trastuzumab (Herceptin®), a monoclonal antibody to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; HER2/neu; epidermal growth factor inhibitors), is already part of the standard treatment of...

Keywords

Breast Cancer Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Metastatic Breast Cancer Cancer Vaccine Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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See also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyVrije Universiteit Medisch Centrum (VUmc)AmsterdamThe Netherlands