Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Renal Cancer Molecular Therapy

  • Yosef S. Haviv
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6330-2

Synonyms

Definition

Renal cancer (synonym: renal carcinoma, kidney cancer) molecular therapy refers to the use of novel medications to specifically target molecular processes leading to, or associated with, renal cancer. These novel medications include bevacizumab, an antibody to the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the small molecules, sunitinib, sorafenib, and temsirolimus or its equivalent everolimus, all inhibiting phosphorylating enzymes (kinase) critical to the growth of renal tumors.

Characteristics

Introduction

Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) affects three in 10,000 people and accounts for 2.3 % of cancer deaths in the USA. The median age at diagnosis is 66 years and the median age of RCC-associated death is 70. The most common types of RCC are defined by their histopathologypattern, i.e., clear-cell RCC and papillary RCC, accounting for 75 % and 12 % of all RCC, respectively. The clear-cell RCC morphology usually derives from an...

Keywords

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Renal Cell Carcinoma Renal Cell Carcinoma Cell Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

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  20. (2012) Transforming Growth Factor Alpha. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3758. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5915Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of NephrologyHadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Department of MedicineJerusalemIsrael