Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Viral Oncology Epigenetics

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6192-2

Definition

Viral oncology epigenetics can represent the epigenetic alterations that occur within the host cell genome as a result of viral infection or virally induced carcinogenesis. Alternatively, viral oncology epigenetics can refer to epigenetic alterations of the viral genome during latent or lytic infection or during carcinogenesis.

Characteristics

One of the emerging concepts in cancer biology is that epigenetic alterations are important in the initiation and early progression of the majority of human cancers. However, differentiation of the early cancer causing epigenetic alterations from later consequences is difficult. Oncogenic viruses are typically very small and with very few genes and yet can induce transformation. Therefore, investigations into the epigenetic alterations that viruses make to the host cell genome may provide an indication of which epigenetic alterations are critical for early carcinogenesis.

Oncogenic virusesinclude any virus that has been identified as...

Keywords

Epigenetic Alteration Burkitt Lymphoma Primary Effusion Lymphoma Histone Acetyltransferase Activity Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) DNA Methylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1140. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1682Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Histone Acetylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1697. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2750Google Scholar
  3. (2012) HTLV-1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1752. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2844Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Hypomethylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1791. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2922Google Scholar
  5. (2012) LMP2. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2068. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3401Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Retrovirus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 3296–3297. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5084Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Reproductive and Developmental BiologyImperial College LondonLondonUK