Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

  • Dieter Marmé
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6155-2

Synonyms

Characteristics

VEGF Family

Four VEGF family members have been described in mammals, VEGF-A through VEGF-D. VEGF-E, the fifth member of the family, is coded by the Orf virus. An additional relative is the placenta-derived growth factor, PlGF. Whereas the VEGFs are potent growth promoting and vascular permeability enhancing factors, PlGF is incapable of inducing permeability. All members exert their biological functions as homodimers. VEGFs act almost exclusively on endothelial cells. VEGF is expressed by almost all cell types with the exception of endothelial cells which express only marginal amounts of the growth factor. Expression is controlled by a number of different mechanisms. Extracellular signals such as growth factors and cytokines are able to induce transcription of the VEGF gene. Activated oncogenes, such as ras, raf, or src, as well as inactivated tumor suppressor genes, such as p53 or von...

Keywords

Diabetic Retinopathy VEGF Receptor VEGF mRNA Cell Surface Adhesive Molecule Physiological Angiogenesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Carmeliet P (2000) Mechanisms of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis. Nat Med 6:389–395CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Siemeister G, Martiny-Baron G, Marmé D (1998) The pivotal role of VEGF in tumor angiogenesis: molecular facts and therapeutic opportunities. Cancer Metastasis Rev 17:241–248CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Veikkola T, Karkkainen M, Claesson-Welsh L et al (2000) Regulation of angiogenesis via vascular endothelial growth factor receptors. Cancer Res 60:203–212PubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Humanized antibodies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1760. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2863Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Monoclonal antibody. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2367. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6842Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Monoclonal antibody therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2367-2368. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3823Google Scholar
  4. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Tumor Biology CenterInstitute of Molecular OncologyFreiburgGermany