Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

UV Radiation

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6139-4

Definition

Solar and UV Radiation

Sunlight consists of visible light (400–700 nm), infrared radiation (>700 nm), and UV radiation. The quality (spectrum) and quantity (intensity) of sunlight are modified during its passage through the atmosphere. Solar UV radiation at ground level represents about 5 % of the total solar energy; the radiation spectrum is between 290 and 400 nm and is comprised of approximately 95 % UVA and 5 % UVB; UVC is completely filtered out by the Earth’s atmosphere.

The spectrum of solar UV radiation to which an individual may be exposed varies with latitude, altitude, ground reflectance, season, time of day, weather, stratospheric ozone, and other atmospheric components such as air pollution. For most individuals, solar radiation is the major source of exposure to UV radiation. Sunbeds and sunlamps used for tanning purposes are the main source of deliberate exposure to artificial UV radiation.

Characteristics

Cancers of the Skin

Skin cancer (see skin...

Keywords

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Skin Cancer Actinic Keratosis Indoor Tanning Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. AFSSET (2005) UV radiation. State of the knowledge on exposure and health risks. Agence française de Sécurité Sanitaire de l’Environnement et du Travail. Available at http://www.afsset.fr (in English)
  2. Griffiths HR, Mistry P, Herbert KE et al (1998) Molecular and cellular effects of ultraviolet light-induced genotoxicity. Crit Rev Clin Lab Sci 35:189–237CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. IARC (1992) Solar and ultraviolet radiation, vol 55, IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  4. IARC (2006) Exposure to artificial UV radiation and skin cancer, vol 1, IARC working group reports. International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  5. IARC (2010) Radiation, vol 100D, IARC monographs on the evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans. International Agency for Research on Cancer, LyonGoogle Scholar
  6. Ullrich SE (2005) Mechanisms underlying UV-induced immune suppression. Mutat Res 571:185–205CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of the IARC MonographsIARC/WHOLyonFrance