Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Tumor-Associated Macrophages

  • Antonio Sica
  • Alessandra Mancino
  • Paola Larghi
  • Luca Rubino
  • Graziella Solinas
  • Paola Allavena
  • Alberto Mantovani
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_6020-4

Definition

Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) define a subset of myeloid cells that highly infiltrate solid tumors. Accumulating evidence clearly demonstrates, in various mouse and human malignancies, including colon, breast, lung, and prostate cancer, a strict correlation between increased numbers and/or density of TAM and poor prognosis. Based on this, recruitment and activation of TAM are regarded as pivotal steps of tumor progression, and TAM are putative targets for therapeutic intervention.

Characteristics

Experimental and clinical studies have revealed that chronic inflammation predisposes to different forms of cancer, including colon cancer, prostate cancer, and liver cancer, and that usage of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can protect against the emergence of various tumors.

In the late 1970s, it was found that a major leukocyte population present in tumors, the so-called TAM, promotes tumor growth. Over the years it has become increasingly clear that TAMs are active...

Keywords

Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Treg Cell Stroma Formation Affect Tumor Cell Proliferation Indoleamine Dioxygenase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Balkwill F, Mantovani A (2001) Inflammation and cancer: back to Virchow? Lancet 357:539–545CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Mantovani A, Sozzani S, Locati M et al (2002) Macrophage polarization: tumor-associated macrophages as a paradigm for polarized M2 mononuclear phagocytes. Trends Immunol 23:549–555CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Sica A, Bronte V (2007) Altered macrophage differentiation and immune dysfunction in tumour development. J Clin Invest 117:1155–1166CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Arachidonic Acid. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 260. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_379Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Liver Cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2063. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3393Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Microenvironment. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2296. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3720Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Xenograft. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3967. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6278Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antonio Sica
    • 1
  • Alessandra Mancino
    • 1
  • Paola Larghi
    • 1
  • Luca Rubino
    • 2
  • Graziella Solinas
    • 1
  • Paola Allavena
    • 1
  • Alberto Mantovani
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyFondazione Humanitas per la RicercaRozzanoItaly
  2. 2.Department of OncologyHumanitas Research Hospital, Humanitas Cancer CenterRozzanoItaly