Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Bcl2

Living reference work entry

Later version available View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_562-4
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Synonyms

Definition

The gene defined in the title of the entry as Bcl2 could be found written in different ways, with or without a line or a space between Bcl and 2. Just like any other gene, technically it should be italicized. In this entry, however, I decided to pay attention to specify whether I was referring to the gene or to the protein.

The Bcl2 family of proteins belong to a peculiar class of proteins regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, differentiation, and autophagy; in oncology, the genes coding for these proteins could not be defined neither as dominant transforming oncogenes (such as myc), nor tumor suppressor genes (such as p53). They could be best defined as apoptosis-related genes, a definition that stresses the importance of apoptosis (and of its dysregulation) in the genesis and development of cancer in humans and other species. Dysregulation of...

Keywords

Bcl2 Family Follicular Lymphoma Bcl2 Protein Bcl2 Expression Bcl2 Family Member 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) APAF-1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 231. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_344Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Autoimmune diseases. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 311. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_473Google Scholar
  3. (2012) BAD. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 337–338. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_519Google Scholar
  4. (2012) BAK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 338. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_521Google Scholar
  5. (2012) BAX. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 350. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_543Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Cell cycle. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 737. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_994Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Differentiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1113. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1616Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Ionizing radiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1907. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3139Google Scholar
  9. (2012) MYC family. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2426. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3922Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Orthologue. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2661. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4263Google Scholar
  11. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2747. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Transcription. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3752. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5899Google Scholar
  13. (2012) Translocation reciprocal. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3773. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5945Google Scholar

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dream Master LaboratoryChandlerUSA