Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Sphingolipid Metabolism

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_5438-5

Definition

Sphingolipids (SLDs) contain sphingosine (Sph) or a similar moiety. Sphingosine (Fig. 1a) is D-erythro- trans-4-octadecene-2-amino-1,3-diol; R 1 is typically a C 13 alkyl chain. Ceramide or Cer (Fig. 1b) is a fatty acid amide of sphingosine that plays a pivotal role in cell growth and death, in which R 2 symbolizes a saturated or monoenoic fatty acid containing 16–32 or more carbon atoms. Some fatty acids have an OH at carbon-2 or at the end carbon. Some ceramides contain phytosphingosine instead of Sph; here the double bond is replaced by an OH at C-4.

Keywords

Gauche Disease Antineoplastic Drug Allylic Alcohol Buthionine Sulfoximine Acidic SMase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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See Also

  1. (2012) AKT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 115. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_163Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Allylic Structures. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 143. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_202Google Scholar
  3. (2012) D-MAPP. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1128. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1659Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Ganglioside Secretion. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1495. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2321Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Gaucher Disease. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1515. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2340Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Glutathione. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1559. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2438Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Histone Acetylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1697. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2750Google Scholar
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  16. (2012) Sphingosine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3485. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5442Google Scholar
  17. (2012) Sulfatide. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3556. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5563Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA