Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Small Molecule Drugs

  • Karl-Heinz Thierauch
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_5374-2

Definition

A small molecule drug in cancer therapy is a molecularly defined chemical entity of low molecular weight, which is applied to a patient with the intention to heal or palliate primary proliferative disease. Or it is directed to prevent secondary consequences of the disease, which are brought about by specific secretory activity of cancer cells or their general deleterious effect on organ and system functions. A very important aspect is the alleviation of pain.

Characteristics

Differences to Large Molecule Drugs

The molecular weight of a small molecule drug is largely found to be below 1,000 Da, as often it has to pass the cell membrane to reach the target of activity.

Large molecule drugs were often less defined as they were of biological origin, e.g., due to posttranslational modifications and impurities. With the increasing power of analytical and preparative techniques and with the advent of molecularly exactly defined oligonucleotides, the distinction of exactly defined...

Keywords

Vinca Alkaloid Small Molecule Drug VEGF Signal Slow Release Formulation Molecular Weight Drug 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Cell Cycle. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 737. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_994Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Constitutive. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 973. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1322Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Differentiation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1113. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1616Google Scholar
  4. (2012) DNA Double Strand Breaks. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1139. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1675Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Ligands. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2040. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3352Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Metabolism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2258. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3660Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Posttranslational Modification. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2966. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4696Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Proliferation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3004. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4766Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Resistance. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3263. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5052Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BerlinGermany