Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Polyphenols

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4677-2

Definition

Polyphenols are plant substances possessing more than one aromatic ring bearing one or more hydroxyl groups, including their functional derivatives, and may occur as unconjugated aglycones or as conjugated with sugars, organic acids, amino acids, or lipids. Examples of polyphenols are epigallocatechin gallate, genistein, resveratrol, quercetin, and rutin. Common dietary sources rich in polyphenols include tea, soybean, berries, chocolate, wine, apple and orange juices, black beans, tomato, sweet peppers, broccoli, and onion.

Characteristics

Polyphenols consist of a family of diverse compounds, which comprises chalcones (butein), dihydrochalcones (tephropurpurin), flavanones (naringenin), flavones (apigenin), dihydroflavonols (engeletin), flavonols (quercetin), flavanols (catechins), isoflavones(genistein), proanthocyanidins (propelargonidins), and anthocyanidins (delphinidin). Their main physiological function is as antioxidants. Therefore, a long-term consumption of a...

Keywords

Cell Signaling Pathway Epigallocatechin Gallate Dietary Polyphenol Inhibit Tumor Invasion Modulate Cell Signaling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Fresco P, Borges F, Diniz C et al (2006) New insights on the anticancer properties of dietary polyphenols. Med Res Rev 26:747–766CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Gardner EJ, Ruxton CH, Leeds AR (2007) Black tea – helpful or harmful? A review of the evidence. Eur J Clin Nutr 61:3–18CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Thomasset SC, Berry DP, Garcea G et al (2007) Dietary polyphenolic phytochemicals – promising cancer chemopreventive agents in humans? A review of their clinical properties. Int J Cancer 120(3):451–458CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. World Cancer Research Fund, American Institute for Cancer Research (2007) Food, nutrition, physical activity, and the prevention of cancer: a global perspective. AICR, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Antioxidant Capacity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 216. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_329Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Carcinogen. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 644. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_839Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Leukoplakia. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2028. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3332Google Scholar
  4. (2012) MAPK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2167. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3532Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2336. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3770Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Scavenge Free Radicals. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3340. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5166Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Xanthine Oxidase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3963. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6270Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Food Science and Human NutritionUniversity of IllinoisUrbana-ChampaignUSA