Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Pleiotrophin

  • Evangelia Papadimitriou
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4621-3

Synonyms

Definition

Pleiotrophin (PTN) is an 18 kDa growth factor that has high affinity for heparin and together with midkine forms a family of structurally related heparin-binding growth factors. The two proteins share 45 % homology in their amino acid sequence and ten perfectly conserved cysteine residues. They also use the same receptors and share many biological activities, the best characterized being neural development and tumor growth.

Characteristics

PTN consists of 168 amino acids that are highly conserved across different species, such as human, mouse, rat, bovine, fish, chicken, frog, and insects. The cleavage of the 32 amino acids signal peptide leads to a secreted protein,...

Keywords

Focal Adhesion Kinase Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase LNCaP Cell Athymic Nude Mouse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Mikelis C, Koutsioumpa M, Papadimitriou E (2007) Pleiotrophin as a possible new target for angiogenesis-related diseases and cancer. Recent Pat Anticancer Drug Discov 2:175–186CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Papadimitriou E, Mikelis C, Lampropoulou E, Koutsioumpa M, Theochari K, Tsirmoula S, Theodoropoulou C, Lamprou M, Sfaelou E, Vourtsis D, Boudouris P (2009) Roles of pleiotrophin in tumor growth and angiogenesis. Eur Cytokine Netw 20:180–190PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Pantazaka E, Papadimitriou E (2012) PTN (pleiotrophin). Atlas Genet Cytogenet Oncol Haematol 16:821–837Google Scholar
  4. Pantazaka E, Papadimitriou E (2014) Chondroitin Sulfate-cell membrane effectors as regulators of growth factor-mediated vascular and cancer cell migration. BBA - General Subjects, 1840:2643–2650CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) AKT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 115. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_163Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Chondroitin sulfate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 821–822. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1118Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Glycosaminoglycans. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1570. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2453Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Heparan sulfate proteoglycans. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1647. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2638Google Scholar
  5. (2012) HOXA5 gene. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1739. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2820Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Leukemia. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2005. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3322Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Midkine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2313. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3743Google Scholar
  8. (2012) N-Syndecan. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2567. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5622Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Pancreas. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2762–2763. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_7055Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3198. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4979Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacy, School of Health SciencesUniversity of PatrasPatrasGreece