Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Phage Display

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4489-3

Synonyms

Definition

Phage display is a molecular technique used to select molecules with specific binding characteristics out of a large pool of genetically engineered bacteriophages displaying combinatorial libraries of proteins via fusion to outer coat proteins of viruses that contain the genes encoding the displayed proteins.

Characteristics

Phage display is a very effective way for producing large numbers of diverse peptides and proteins and isolating molecules with specific binding and functional characteristics. The filamentous phage was the first to be used and currently remains the most commonly employed bacterial virus for phage display. Phage display involves the expression of polypeptides on the surface of a bacteriophage. Typically foreign proteins are incorporated into the amino-terminus of pIII, pVIII, and, less frequently, pVI coat proteins in a filamentous phage display. The lytic bacteriophage vectors such as lambda, T4, and T7 have also been...

Keywords

Phage Display Phage Library Filamentous Phage cDNA Expression Library Phage Display Technology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. Antiangiogenic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 207. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_310Google Scholar
  2. Antimetabolite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 216. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_326Google Scholar
  3. Bacteriophage. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 337. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_515Google Scholar
  4. Biomarkers. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 408–409. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6601Google Scholar
  5. Cytotoxins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1058. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1502Google Scholar
  6. Epitope. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1297. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1966Google Scholar
  7. Immunoscreening cDNA expression libraries. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1831. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3009Google Scholar
  8. Ligands. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2040. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3352Google Scholar
  9. Liposomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2063. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3388Google Scholar
  10. Monoclonal antibody therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2367–2368. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3823Google Scholar
  11. Nanoparticles. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2449. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3964Google Scholar
  12. Phage. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2836. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4488Google Scholar
  13. Phagemid. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2839. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4490Google Scholar
  14. Photosensitizer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2881–2882. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4559Google Scholar
  15. V-Gene. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3907. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6182Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Vermont Comprehensive Cancer Center, College of MedicineUniversity of VermontBurlingtonUSA