Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Nonviral Vector for Cancer Therapy

  • Atsuko Fujihara
  • Yasufumi Kaneda
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_4121-2

Definition

Nonviral vectors can deliver therapeutic molecules into cells for the treatment of cancer. The molecules used for this purpose are usually anticancer drugs, short interfering RNA ( siRNA), and DNA (Table 1). Nonviral vectors can also be employed for the delivery of proteins, peptides, and messenger RNA, but such agents are not so frequently used for cancer therapy. Antisense oligonucleotides ( antisense DNA therapy) were previously employed to suppress gene expression, but siRNA has recently taken their place.
Table 1

Therapeutic molecules for cancer treatment delivered using nonviral vectors

Anticancer drugs

siRNA

DNA

Bleomycin

Rad51

p53

Cisplatin

VEGF

B7–1

Doxorubicin

HIF-1α

IL-12

Methotrexate

β-catenin

HSV-tk

Keywords

Antitumor Immunity Cationic Liposome Sendai Virus Therapeutic Molecule Nonviral Vector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Conwell CC, Huang L (2005) Recent advances in non-viral gene delivery. In: Huang L, Hung MC, Wagner E (eds) Non-viral vectors for gene therapy. Elsevier Academic, San Diego, pp 3–18CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Kakizawa Y, Kataoka K (2002) Block copolymer micelles for delivery of gene and related compounds. Adv Drug Deliv Rev 54:203–222CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Kaneda Y, Tabata Y (2006) Non-viral vectors for cancer therapy. Cancer Sci 97:348–354CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Kaneda Y, Yamamoto S, Nakajima T (2005) Development of HVJ envelope vector and its application to gene therapy. In: Huang L, Hung MC, Wagner E (eds) Non-viral vectors for gene therapy. Elsevier Academic, San Diego, pp 307–332Google Scholar
  5. Kostarelos K, Miller AD (2005) What role can chemistry play in cationic liposome-based gene therapy research today? In: Huang L, Hung MC, Wagner E (eds) Non-viral vectors for gene therapy. Elsevier Academic, San Diego, pp 71–118Google Scholar
  6. Kurooka M, Kaneda Y (2007) Inactivated Sendai virus particles eradicate tumors by inducing immune responses through blocking regulatory T cells. Cancer Res. 67;227–236.Google Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Dendrimer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1080. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1554Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Glioblastoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1554. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2421Google Scholar
  3. (2012) HVJ. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1767. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2873Google Scholar
  4. (2012) HVJ-Liposomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1767. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2875Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Liposomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2063. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3388Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Micelles. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2289. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3707Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Polymers. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2954. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4672Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Therapeutic active targeting. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3667. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5762Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Therapeutic passive targeting. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 3667-3668. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5765Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Virosomes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 3920-3921. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6196Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of UrologyKyoto Prefectural University of MedicineKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Gene Therapy Science, Graduate School of MedicineOsaka UniversitySuitaJapan