Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Asbestos

  • Eugene D. Weinberg
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_409-2

Definition

Asbestos is a commercial term for a group of crystalline silicates that are composed of long thin fibers. Formerly, the noncombustible mineral was incorporated into a great variety of industrial and building materials. However, asbestos can be easily broken into tiny microscopic fibers and inhaled. In the lungs, the indestructible fibers may, over time, increase in size due to acquisition of ferritin/hemosiderin from proximal dying macrophages. After many years, the inhaled fibers can be carcinogenic. Thus commercial use of asbestos has been banned.

Characteristics

Carcinogenic Action of Iron

During the past 80 years, authors of scores of clinical and laboratory studies have reported that one of the many dangers of excessive/misplaced iron is its ability to initiate and to promote neoplastic cell growth. Initiation occurs via iron-catalyzed formation of reactive oxygen radicals (reactive oxygen species; oxidative stress) that, when generated in close proximity to DNA, can...

Keywords

Esophageal Cancer Iron Chelator Asbestos Fiber Crystalline Silicate Redox Active Iron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Hardy JA, Aust AE (1995) Iron in asbestos chemistry and carcinogenesis. Chem Rev 95:97–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Weinberg ED (1996) The role of iron in cancer. Eur J Cancer Prev 5:19–36PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Weinberg ED (1999) The development of awareness of the carcinogenic hazard of inhaled iron. Oncol Res 11:109–113PubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Crocidolite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 998. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1378Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Chrysotile. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 856. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1163Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Erionite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1307. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1986Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Ferritin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1391. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2148Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Ferruginous bodies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1391. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2149Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Smoking. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3455. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5382Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Tremolite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3782. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5968Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Zeolite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3975. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6297Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Biology and Medical SciencesIndiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA