Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_405-2

Synonyms

Definition

The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a protein that recognizes a variety of usually plane hydrophobic xenobiotics, as well as a few endogenous compounds. Upon activation, the AhR triggers a signaling and transcriptional program leading to adaptive cellular processes and toxic effects.

Characteristics

Historical Perspective

Xenobiotic Stress

Exposure of cells and organisms to foreign compounds called xenobiotics leads to an adaptive response, which consists in the induction of a variety of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), ultimately leading to the metabolization, detoxification, and elimination of these putative toxic compounds. In analogy with other cellular stresses, this adaptive response could be termed xenobiotic stress. It is best illustrated in the case of hydrophobic and plane compounds such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH, e.g., benzopyrenes) or halogenated polyaromatic hydrocarbons (dioxins), which trigger a...

Keywords

Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Carcinogen Metabolism Tryptophan Derivative Xenobiotic Responsive Element Aromatase Gene Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Benzo(a)pyrene. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 384. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_582Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Chemoprevention. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 778. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1070Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Cytokine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1051. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1473Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Flavonoids. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1416. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2204Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Genotoxic. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1540. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2393Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Glutathione. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1559. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2438Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Helix-loop-helix domain. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1639. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2607Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Immortalization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1811. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2969Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Knock-out mouse. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1957. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3239Google Scholar
  10. (2012) MAPK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2167. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3532Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Nrf2. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2566. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4139Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Progesterone receptor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2990. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4754Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Inserm Inserm UMR-S1124, Université Paris DescartesParisFrance