Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Modular Transporters

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3805-2

Synonyms

Definition

Modular transporters are engineered polypeptides consisting of several interchangeable parts or modules designed for delivery of anticancer drugs to the target cancer cell and its specific subcellular compartment.

Modular transporters can also be considered as nanomedical drug vehicles (nanotechnology), which recognize the cancer cells of choice and, once in those cells, are transported to the most sensitive compartment of the cell (e.g., nucleus).

In order to reach the desired compartment of the cancer cell, the modular transporters are first passively delivered to the surface of the cell in the bloodstream. Once within the cell, depending upon the nature of the polypeptide modules, they are transported to a particular subcellular compartment utilizing the cell’s intrinsic transport machinery.

Characteristics

Objectives

To minimize side effects, many antitumor agents need to be delivered ( drug delivery )...

Keywords

Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Acute Myeloid Leukemia Antitumor Agent Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cell Nuclear Localization Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Gilyazova DG, Rosenkranz AA, Gulak PV et al (2006) Targeting cancer cells by novel engineered modular transporters. Cancer Res 66:10534–10540CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Slastnikova TA, Rosenkranz AA, Gulak PV et al (2012) Modular nanotransporters: a multipurpose in vivo working platform for targeted drug delivery. Int J Nanomedicine 7:467–482Google Scholar
  3. Slastnikova TA, Rosenkranz AA, Zalutsky MR, Sobolev AS (2015) Modular nanotransporters for targeted intracellular delivery of drugs: folate receptors as potential targets. Curr Pharm Design 21:1227–1238Google Scholar
  4. Urieto JO, Liu TF, Black JH et al (2004) Expression and purification of the recombinant diphtheria fusion toxin DTIL3 for phase I clinical trials. Protein Expr Purif 33:123–133CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Alpha-Particles. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 147. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_208Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Importins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1836. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3017Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Ligands. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2040. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3352Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Module. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2354. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3806Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Photosensitizer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2881-2882. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4559Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Polypeptide. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2955. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4676Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Radionuclide. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3154. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4921Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Subcellular Compartments. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3552. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5548Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Tyrosine Kinase Receptors. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3824. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6081Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Molecular Genetics of Intracellular TransportInstitute of Gene Biology, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia