Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Migration

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3746-2

Synonyms

Definition

Cell migration can be defined as the movement of cells from one site to another and is a central process in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms. The orchestrated movement of cells in a particular direction to a specific location is essential for tissue formation during embryonic development, wound healing, and immune responses. Deregulation of cell migration during any of these processes has serious consequences and can contribute to mental retardation, vascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis, tumor formation, and metastasis.

Characteristics

Cell migration (the movement of cells from one site to another) is an essential process for normal development and homeostasis that can also contribute to important pathologies such as neoplasia. For example, one of the major mechanisms involved in tumor cell invasionis cell migration, a process in which cells demonstrating higher invasive capacity typically show higher...

Keywords

Actin Filament Focal Adhesion Stress Fiber Myosin Light Chain Actin Polymerization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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Notes

Acknowledgment

This work was supported by a grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR MOP-74610).

References

  1. Hall A (2005) Rho GTPases and the control of cell behaviour. Biochem Soc Trans 33:891–895CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Lauffenburger DA, Horwitz AF (1996) Cell migration: a physically integrated molecular process. Cell 84:359–369CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Raftopoulou M, Hall A (2004) Cell migration: Rho GTPases lead the way. Dev Biol 265:23–32CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Ridley AJ, Schwartz MA, Burridge K et al (2003) Cell migration: integrating signals from front to back. Science 302:1704–1709CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Salhia B, Tran NL, Symons M et al (2006) Molecular pathways triggering glioma cell invasion. Expert Rev Mol Diagn 6:613–626CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

  1. (2012) Actin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 18–19. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_42Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Extracellular matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1362. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Filipodia. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1407. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2189Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Focal contact. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1440. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2230Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Glioma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1557. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2423Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Integrin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1884. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3084Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Lamellipodia. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1971. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3267Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Medullary breast carcinoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2199. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3599Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Arthur and Sonia Labatt Brain Tumour Research CentreThe Hospital for Sick Children, The University of TorontoTorontoUSA
  2. 2.Cancer and Cell Biology DivisionThe Translational Genomics Research InstitutePhoenixUSA