Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Microsatellite Instability

  • Terje C. Ahlquist
  • Ragnhild A. Lothe
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3731-2

Definition

Microsatellite instability (MSI) is the accumulation of novel microsatellite alleles in genomes (from bacteria to human) due to defect in mismatch repair.

Microsatellites are site specific DNA markers with high abundance throughout the genome. They consist of short repetitive motifs of 1–6 nucleotides in length that are tandemly repeated 10–60 times and flanked by unique sequences (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Endometrial Cancer Lynch Syndrome Mismatch Repair Mismatch Repair Gene Mismatch Repair System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Boland CR, Thibodeau SN, Hamilton SR et al (1998) A National Cancer Institute Workshop on Microsatellite Instability for cancer detection and familial predisposition: development of international criteria for the determination of microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer. Cancer Res 58:5248–5257PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Loeb LA (1994) Microsatellite instability: marker of a mutator phenotype in cancer. Cancer Res 54:5059–5063PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Lothe RA (1997) Microsatellite instability in human solid tumors. Mol Med Today 3:61–68CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Popat S, Hubner R, Houlston RS (2005) Systematic review of microsatellite instability and colorectal cancer prognosis. J Clin Oncol 23:609–618CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Røyrvik E, Ahlquist T, Rognes T et al (2007) Slip slidin’ away: a duodecennial review of targeted genes in mismatch repair deficient colorectal cancer. Crit Rev Oncog 13(3):229–257Google Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Microsatellite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2305. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3730Google Scholar
  2. (2012) MLH1/3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2348. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3789Google Scholar
  3. (2012) MSH2–6. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2383. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3860Google Scholar
  4. (2012) MutHLS. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2420. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3914Google Scholar
  5. (2012) PMS1/2. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2931. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4646Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Roche NorwayOsloNorway
  2. 2.Department of Cancer PreventionRikshospitalet-Radiumhospitalet Medical CentreOsloNorway