Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Microcell-Mediated Chromosome Transfer

  • Maria Li Lung
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3716-2

Definition

Microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT) is a method of transfer of intact or truncated chromosomes from a donor cell to a recipient cell through microcell fusion and hybrid cell selection. A microcell hybrid stably maintains the additional genetic material as functioning units within the cells. This technique is primarily used for transfer of a single donor chromosome (monochromosome transfer) of interest into a recipient cell.

Characteristics

A method of mammalian gene transfer, termed microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (MMCT), allows the stable introduction of exogenous chromosomal material from a donor cell into a recipient cell. MMCT is generally used to transfer a portion of the genetic information (generally one chromosome) from one cell to another. This procedure is used for genetics, gene mapping, and gene expression/regulation studies in mammalian cells. One or more intact or truncated chromosomes from the donor cell can be transferred into the recipient...

Keywords

Donor Cell Recipient Cell Candidate Tumor Suppressor Gene Donor Chromosome Microcell Hybrid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Dowdy SF, Scanlon DJ, Fasching CL et al (1990) Irradiation microcell-mediated chromosome transfer (XMMCT): the generation of specific chromosomal arm deletions. Genes Chromosomes Cancer 2:319–327CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  4. Saxon PJ, Srivatsan ES, Leipzig GV et al (1985) Selective transfer of individual human chromosomes to recipient cells. Mol Cell Biol 5:140–146CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Stanbridge EJ, Dowdy S, Bader S et al (1991) Monochromosome transfer provides functional evidence for tumor suppressor genes. In: Brugge J, Curran T, Harlow E, McCormick F (eds) Origins of human cancer: a comprehensive review. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, New York, pp 393–401Google Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Enucleate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1259. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1914Google Scholar
  2. (2012) FISH. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1415–1416. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2197Google Scholar
  3. (2012) HAT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1632–1633. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2573Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Heterokaryon. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1689. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2697Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Karyoplast. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1941. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3199Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Microcell. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2292. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3714Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Microcell Hybrid. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2292. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3715Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Micronucleus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2300. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3726Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Senescence. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3370. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5236Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical Oncology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of MedicineThe University of Hong KongHong KongChina