Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

MIC-1

  • David A. Brown
  • Asne R. Bauskin
  • Samuel N. Breit
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3704-2

Synonyms

Definition

Macrophage inhibitory cytokine 1, also known as growth differentiation factor 15 (MIC-1/GDF15), is a divergent member of the human TGF-b superfamily (Transforming Growth Factor Beta), which was originally cloned on the basis of increased expression with macrophage activation but has subsequently been found to be strongly linked to cancer.

Characteristics

The MIC-1/GDF15 gene, localized on chromosome 19p12-13.1, consists of two exons separated by an intronic sequence of about 1,800 bp. Exon I is 309 bp in length and contains 71 bp of 5′ untranslated sequence. Exon II is 891 bp in length with a 3′ untranslated region of 244 bp. A single nucleotide polymorphism in the MIC-1/GDF15 coding region results in the change of a histidine (H) to an aspartic acid (D) residue at position 6 of the mature MIC-1/GDF15 protein (Fig. 1). While other polymorphisms have been...

Keywords

Prostate Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Tramp Mouse GDF15 Level GDF15 Expression 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Biomarkers. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 408–409. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6601Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Egr-1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1212. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1832Google Scholar
  3. (2012) ERK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 1307–1308. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1987Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Extracellular matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1362. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Immunodeficient nude mice. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1816. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2986Google Scholar
  6. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2747. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  7. (2012) PSA. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3111–3112. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6738Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Single nucleotide polymorphism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3412. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5316Google Scholar
  9. (2012) TGF-β superfamily. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3662. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5756Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • David A. Brown
    • 1
  • Asne R. Bauskin
    • 2
  • Samuel N. Breit
    • 3
  1. 1.St. Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical ResearchSt Vincent’s Hospital, University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Department of MedicineCentre for Immunology, St. Vincent’s Hospital, University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Cytokine Biology and Inflammation Research Program, St Vincent’s Centre for Applied Medical Research (AMR)St Vincent’s HospitalSydneyAustralia