Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Membrane Transporters

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3628-5

Synonyms

Definition

Membrane transport proteins are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes and transfer ions and small molecules across these biological membranes. Several membrane transporters contribute to the resistance of tumor cells against anticancer drugs.

Characteristics

General Features

Membrane transporters mediate the movement of ions and small molecules across the plasma membrane and the membranes of intracellular compartments such as mitochondria, lysosomes, and vesicles. The human genome comprises at least 530 genes for plasma membrane transporters (1.7 % of total genes) and 350 genes for intracellular membrane transporters (1.1 % of total genes). Membrane transporters typically have several transmembrane segments, each consisting of a stretch of 20–25 hydrophobic amino acids that spans the lipid bilayer of a biological membrane.

According to the direction of the transported molecules, membrane transport can be classified as...

Keywords

Membrane Transporter Multidrug Resistance Protein Flow Through Channel Uptake Transporter Drug Efflux Pump 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) ATP-binding cassette transporters. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 302. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_441Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Breast cancer resistance protein. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 546–547. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_719Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Brush border. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 572. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_744Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Camptothecin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 603. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_791Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Methotrexate. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2274. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3680Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Multidrug resistance. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2393. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3887Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Multidrug resistance proteins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2393. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3888Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Podophyllotoxins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2932. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4650Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Solute carrier transporters. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3466. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5407Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Taxanes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3614–3615. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6648Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Vinca alkaloids. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3908. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6187Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dr. Margarete Fischer-Bosch-Institut für Klinische PharmakologieStuttgartGermany