Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Malignant Lymphoma: Hallmarks and Concepts

  • H. K. Müller-Hermelink
  • G. Ott
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3509-2

Definition

Malignant lymphomas are clonal tumors of B cells, T cells, or natural killer cells showing a wide range of differentiation. Contrary to most organs and tissues, and in spite of the fact that lymphomas show a wide range of aggressiveness from localized, indolent to highly aggressive, rapidly metastasizing tumors, no bona fide “benign” lymphomas have been defined. Distinct lymphoma entities in general show a characteristic clinical behavior and common morphological, immunological, and genetic features, but within these entities a broad spectrum of aggressiveness may be observed in individual cases, which is either due to disease or the involvement of specific risk factors.

Characteristics

Basic Clinical Features of Malignant Lymphoma

Malignant lymphomas occur at a frequency of about 12/100,000 per year in the Western population, equivalent to about 10,000 new cases in Germany per year. The incidence rate of Hodgkin lymphoma, with a frequency of about 3/100,000 per year, has...

Keywords

Cell Lymphoma Follicular Lymphoma Hodgkin Lymphoma Burkitt Lymphoma Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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See Also

  1. (2012) APC. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 234. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_347Google Scholar
  2. (2012) B Cell. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 331. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_508Google Scholar
  3. (2012) CD20. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 693. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_922Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Gene expression profiling. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1522. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2368Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Germinal center. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1541. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2401Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Loss of heterozygosity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2075–2076. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3415Google Scholar
  7. (2012) RB1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3189. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4964Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Reed-Sternberg cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3214. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5010Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Somatic hypermutation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3466–3467. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5410Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of PathologyUniversity of WürzburgWürzburgGermany
  2. 2.Department of Clinical PathologyRobert-Bosch-KrankenhausStuttgartGermany