Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Luciferase Reporter Gene Assays

  • Paul Bauer
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3430-2

Synonyms

Definition

Luciferase reporter gene assays monitor the transcription of specific genes in cells and in vivo through the detection of light generated by the enzyme luciferase. Their primary uses are for mapping the control regions of genes, for measuring signal transduction pathways modulated by hormones or disease, as a tool in gene therapy and drug discovery, and for noninvasive whole-animal imaging.

Characteristics

Luciferase reporter gene assays are a type of reporter gene assay that utilize the light generated by one of a family of enzymes known as luciferases. Reporter genes are essential tools in the study of gene expression and regulation, as they are designed to function as surrogates for genes involved in key cellular processes and disease. To achieve this role, they are engineered so that their expression is directly correlated with the expression of the gene to be studied, but they have the advantage that they are easier to...

Keywords

Reporter Gene Luciferase Reporter Gene Small Molecule Drug Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay Dual Reporter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Chemical Tool. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 763–764. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1060Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Orphan GPCR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2656. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4261Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Pharmacokinetics. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2845. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4500Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Protein-fragment Complementation Assays. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3099. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4797Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Reporter Gene Assays. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3263. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5046Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pfizer Research Technology CenterCambridgeUSA