Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

AP-1

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_341-2

Definition

Activating protein-1 (AP-1) is a transcription factor usually consisting of a member of the Jun family and a member of the Fos or ATF family of proto-oncogenes. AP-1 is activated in response to cytokines, growth factors, and stress factors during cell differentiation, tumor formation, or mitogenic response.

Characteristics

Much of our present knowledge about transcription factors comes from the discovery and study of the activating protein-1 (AP-1) family. AP-1 (and the transcription factor NFκB) has served to detect one of the decisive DNA-binding motifs required for gene regulation by a variety of extracellular signals including growth factors, cytokines, tumor promoters, such as the phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), and carcinogens, for example, UV irradiation and other DNA-damaging agents. One of its members, the heterodimer Fos-Jun, was found in the mid-1980s, as a protein complex containing the viral oncogeneproduct Fos without a clue of its...

Keywords

Primary Liver Cell Culture Tumor Suppressor Gene MEN1 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Eferl R, Wagner EF (2003) AP-1: a double-edged sword in tumorigenesis. Nat Rev Cancer 3:859–868CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Hess J, Angel P, Schorpp-Kistner M (2004) AP-1 subunits: quarrel and harmony among siblings. J Cell Sci 117:5965–5973CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Shaulian E, Karin M (2002) AP-1 as a regulator of cell life and death. Nat Cell Biol 4:E131–E136CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Wagner EF (2001) AP-1 reviews. Oncogene 20:2333–2497CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Weston CR, Davis RJ (2002) The JNK signal transduction pathway. Curr Opin Genet Dev 12:14–21CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Cellular Transformation Assay. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 743. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1020Google Scholar
  2. (2012) G-protein Couple Receptor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1587. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2294Google Scholar
  3. (2012) MAPK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2167. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3532Google Scholar
  4. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Polyubiquitination. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2957. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4678Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Signal Transduction and Growth ControlDeutsches KrebsforschungszentrumHeidelbergGermany