Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Kaplan-Meier Survival Analysis

  • Warren L. May
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3196-2

Synonyms

Definition

Kaplan–Meier survival analysis is a nonparametric method of summarizing survival event probabilities in tabular and graphical form.

Characteristics

Often, the focus of cancer epidemiology studies is on measurement of disease-free survival time (see also epidemiology of cancer). For example, the success of a breast cancer treatment might be discussed in terms of time-until-relapse or cancer-free survival time. To measure time effectively, a meaningful origin is chosen such as birth, first diagnosis of cancer, beginning of treatment, or last known occurrence of the disease. In a randomized study or clinical trial, we might begin measuring time at the point of randomization to treatment. Typically, time is measured prospectively in a survival study in contrast to the retrospective measurement of exposure in the case–control association study.

The outcome of interest is often measured as...

Keywords

Event Time Failure Time Survival Distribution Meier Estimator Case Control Association Study 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Allison PD (1995) Survival analysis using the SAS system: a practical guide. SAS Institute, CaryGoogle Scholar
  2. Cox DR (1972) Regression models and life tables. J R Stat Soc B 34:187–220Google Scholar
  3. Kaplan EL, Meier P (1958) Nonparametric estimation from incomplete observations. J Am Stat Assoc 53:457–481CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Lee ET (1992) Statistical methods for survival data analysis, 2nd edn. Wiley, New YorkGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Censoring. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 744. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1022Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cox Proportional Hazards Model. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 988–989. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1357Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Mann–Whitney U-test. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2160. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3528Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Nonparametric. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2538. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4122Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Parametric. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2784. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4385Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Randomization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3164. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4944Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Survival. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3583. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5606Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Health Administration, School of Health Related ProfessionsUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA