Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Immunoprevention

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_3004-6

Synonyms

Definition

Prevention of cancer onset or of early cancer development and progression by means of immunological treatments, such as vaccines, antibodies, or cytokines.

Characteristics

Immunoprevention of cancer can be applied to tumors caused by viruses and other infectious agents or to tumors unrelated to infectious agents. In both cases, the aim is the same; however, the underlying concepts and the advancement of clinical development are different. Prevention of viral tumors is based on vaccines against viral antigens, whereas immunoprevention of tumors unrelated to infectious agents targets antigens expressed by early neoplastic cells.

Immunoprevention of Viral Tumors

About 16 % of all human tumors are directly caused by infectious agents or indirectly by persisting inflammation accompanying chronic infection. In such cases, the application of immunological strategies to prevent infection is a type of primary cancer prevention because it aims at...

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Tumor Antigen Target Antigen Preneoplastic Lesion Tumor Onset 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Autoimmunity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 312. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_478Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cancer-prone genetically modified mouse models. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 635. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_813Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Oncoantigen. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2609. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4216Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Primary cancer prevention. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2985. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4731Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Secondary cancer prevention. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3347. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5198Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Virus-like particles. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3924–3925. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6199Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Laboratory of Immunology and Biology of Metastasis, Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty MedicineUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly