Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Hyaluronan Synthases

  • Natalie Thomas
  • Vera Evtimov
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2878-2

Synonyms

Definition

Hyaluronan synthases (HASs) are multi-isoform transmembrane proteins which catalyze the synthesis of the high molecular weight carbohydrate, hyaluronan (HA). High expression of hyaluronan synthases in a neoplasm or associated peritumoral stroma is often a poor prognostic indicator in cancer. Hyaluronan is a ubiquitous component of the extracellular matrix where it has various roles in matrix hydration, promotion of cellular growth and proliferation, induction of malignant transformation, and invasion and metastasis.

Characteristics

Hyaluronan Synthases and Hyaluronan

Hyaluronan synthases (HAS1, HAS2, HAS3) are integral plasma membrane proteins that utilize UDP-glucuronic acid and UDP- N-acetylglucosamine substrates to alternately add monosaccharide units to the reducing end of a growing chain of hyaluronan (HA). Three isoenzymes (designated HAS1, HAS2, and HAS3) are localized to separate chromosomes and exhibit...

Keywords

Hyaluronic Acid Cancer Stem Cell Focal Adhesion Kinase Hyaluronic Acid Synthases Integral Plasma Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Adamia S, Maxwell CA, Pilarski LM (2005) Hyaluronan and hyaluronan synthases: potential therapeutic targets in cancer. Curr Drug Targets Cardiovasc Haematol Disord 5:3–14CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Itano N, Kimata K (2002) Mammalian hyaluronan synthases. IUBMB Life 54:195–199CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Stern R (2005) Hyaluronan metabolism: a major paradox in cancer biology. Pathol Biol (Paris) 53:372–382CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Toole BP (2004) Hyaluronan: from extracellular glue to pericellular cue. Nat Rev Cancer 4:528–539CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Visvader JE, Lindeman GJ (2012) Cancer stem cells: current status and evolving complexities. Cell Stem Cell 10:717–728CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Actin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 18–19. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_42Google Scholar
  2. (2012) AKT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 115. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_163Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Proteoglycans. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3100. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4816Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Resistance. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3263. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5052Google Scholar
  5. (2012) RHAMM. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3301. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5095Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Stroma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3541. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5532Google Scholar
  7. (2012) TGF-β. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3661. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5753Google Scholar
  8. (2012) TNF-α. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3713. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5841Google Scholar
  9. (2012) UDP. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3835. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6092Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Extracellular matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1362. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Glycocalyx. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1569. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2445Google Scholar
  12. (2012) HA. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1625. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2550Google Scholar
  13. (2012) HAS1. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1632. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2569Google Scholar
  14. (2012) HAS2. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1632. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2570Google Scholar
  15. (2012) HAS3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1632. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2571Google Scholar
  16. (2012) Hyaluronan. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1767. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2876Google Scholar
  17. (2012) Pericellular matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2814. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4447Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Crown Copyright 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Clinical Network Services Pty LtdSt AlbansUK
  2. 2.Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia