Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Hodgkin and Reed/Sternberg Cell

  • Ralf Küppers
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2784-5

Definition

Hodgkin and Reed/Sternberg (HRS) cells are large cells with a peculiar morphology and immunophenotype that does not resemble any other normal cell in the body. The cells are called Hodgkin cells when they are mononucleated and Reed/Sternberg cells when they are bi- or multinucleated. HRS cells in nearly all instances derive from B lymphocytes, but in rare cases they originate from T cells. HRS cells are the hallmark cells of Hodgkin lymphoma, in which they represent the tumor cell clone.

Characteristics

Associated Pathologies

The first cases of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) were described by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. A peculiar type of cells that is a hallmark of HL was first characterized in detail about 100 years ago by Dorothy Reed and Carl Sternberg. These cells are called Hodgkin cells when they are mononucleated and Reed/Sternberg cells when they are bi- or multinucleated. HRS cells are large cells ten times or more of the size of small lymphocytes with prominent nucleoli....

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Germinal Center Hodgkin Lymphoma Infectious Mononucleosis Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Küppers R (2009) Molecular biology of Hodgkin lymphoma. Nat Rev Cancer 9:15–27PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Küppers R, Engert A, Hansmann ML (2012) Hodgkin lymphoma. J Clin Invest 122:3439–3447PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Steidl C, Conners JM, Gascoyne RD (2011) Molecular pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma: increasing evidence of the importance of the microenvironment. J Clin Oncol 29:1812–1826PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Germinal center. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1541. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2401Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Infectious mononucleosis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1848. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3042Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Somatic hypermutation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3466–3467. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5410Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Cell Biology (Cancer Research)University of Duisburg-Essen, Medical SchoolEssenGermany