Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Granulosa Cell Tumors

  • Alan L. Johnson
  • Dori C. Woods
  • Alisha M. Truman
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2508-2

Definition

Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) are rare forms of ovarian cancer derived from the somatic cells that immediately surround the developing oocyte. Initial prognosis is favorable, yet a propensity for late relapse requires prolonged observation. GCTs represent only 2–5 % of all ovarian tumors, yet are the most common type of malignant sex cord stromal cell tumor. This latter, broad classification of heterogeneous tumors includes epithelial cells derived from the ovarian stroma, the rete ovarii, and developing ovarian follicles.

Characteristics

GCTs typically represent slow-growing neoplasms, with 5–25 % of these tumors exhibiting malignant potential. In particular, GCTs can be differentiated from cancers originating from the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) in that the former typically exhibit enhanced steroidogenic potential associated with gonadotropin responsiveness and thus are considered an endocrine tumor. GCTs frequently produce elevated levels of estrogen that initiates...

Keywords

Ovarian Surface Epithelium Uterine Leiomyoma Granulosa Cell Tumor Juvenile Type Point Missense Mutation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan L. Johnson
    • 1
  • Dori C. Woods
    • 2
  • Alisha M. Truman
    • 2
  1. 1.Pennsylvania State UniversityState CollegeUSA
  2. 2.Northeastern UniversityBostonUSA