Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

G2/M Transition

  • Mark Jackman
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2468-2

Definition

The G2/M transition is a decisive point in a cell’s life cycle. The point at which, after successfully completing a second growth phase (G2 phase) following the replication of its DNA (S phase), it begins mitosis (M phase), the phase during which it physically separates itself into two daughter cells (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Pivotal Shift Cdc25 Protein CDK1 Kinase Activity Spindle Apparatus Cyclin Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Jackman MR, Pines JN (1997) Cyclins and the G2/M transition. Cancer Surv 29:47–71PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Nigg EA (2001) Mitotic kinases as regulators of cell division and its checkpoints. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 2:21–32CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Ohi R, Gould KL (1999) Regulating the onset of mitosis. Curr Opin Cell Biol 11:267–273CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Pines J (1999) Four dimensional control of the cell cycle. Nat Cell Biol 1:E73–E79CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Checkpoint. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 754–755. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1049Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Chromosome Condensation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 848. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1148Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Endoplasmic Reticulum. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1240. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1887Google Scholar
  4. (2012) G2/M Checkpoint. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1481. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2466Google Scholar
  5. (2012) G2/M Cyclins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1481–1482. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2467Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Microtubules. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2312. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3740Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Nuclear Envelope Breakdown. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2567. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4148Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Nucleolus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2574. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4161Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Plasma Membrane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2900. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4599Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Polo-Like Kinase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2934–2935. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4654Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Sister-Chromatids. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3418. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5329Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Spindle Pole Apparatus. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3486. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5446Google Scholar
  13. (2012) Translation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3770. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5936Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Wellcome/CRC InstituteCambridgeUK