Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Gastrin-Releasing Peptide

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2332-2

Synonyms

Definition

GRP is a peptide hormone of 27 amino acids, with the sequence VPLPAGGGTVLTKMYPRGNHWAVGHLMamide.

Characteristics

The tetradecapeptide bombesin was first isolated and characterized from the skin of the frog Bombina bombina in 1970. A decade later, the mammalian counterpart of bombesin was identified using an anti-bombesin antibody and named gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). The name GRP arises from the first known activity of inducing gastrin secretion from G cells in the gastric antrum.

The human GRP gene maps to chromosome band 18q21. The three GRP mRNAs, which arise from a single nascent mRNA by alternate splicing at the junction between exons 2 and 3, encode peptides of 148, 141, and 138 amino acids. Like many neuropeptides, mature amidated GRP arises by a series of well-defined processing steps from these initial large translation products. All three GRP mRNAs encode GRP1–27 and...

Keywords

Focal Adhesion Kinase Pancreatic Cancer Cell Line Human Gastric Carcinoma Cell Line SCLC Cell Line Human Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Cell Line 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Patel O, Shulkes A, Baldwin GS (2006) Gastrin-releasing peptide and cancer. Biochim Biophys Acta Rev Cancer 1766:23–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Qu X, Xiao D, Weber HC (2003) Biologic relevance of mammalian bombesin-like peptides and their receptors in human malignancies. Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes 10:60–71CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Zhou J, Chen J, Mokotoff M et al (2004) Targeting gastrin-releasing peptide receptors for cancer treatment. Anticancer Drugs 15:921–927CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Autocrine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 311. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_468Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Bombesin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 441. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_678Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Knock-Out Mouse. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1957. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3239Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2336. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3770Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Phospholipase C. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2869. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4539Google Scholar
  6. (2012) RT-PCR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3322. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5129Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Small Cell Lung Carcinoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3448. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5368Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Xenograft. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3967. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6278Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oneel Patel
    • 1
  • Arthur Shulkes
    • 1
  • Graham S. Baldwin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, Austin HealthThe University of MelbourneHeidelbergAustralia