Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Gangliosides

  • Stephan Ladisch
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2322-2

Synonyms

Definition

A family of complex amphiphatic molecules, consisting of a carbohydrate and a lipid portion. The carbohydrate portion is comprised of one or more sialic acids linked to an oligosaccharide. The complex carbohydrate in turn is linked to ceramide, a lipid that consists of sphingosine and a fatty acyl residue.

Characteristics

Gangliosides, in addition to being ubiquitous components of normal cell membranes, are highly associated with tumors. A diverse group of molecules, marked structural differences characterize many gangliosides of tumor origin in comparison with gangliosides of normal tissues. Ganglioside biological activities can be highly dependent upon ganglioside molecular structure.

Structure

The ganglioside molecule consists of an oligosaccharide core to which is attached one or more sialic acids and a hydrophobic lipid (ceramide) consisting of sphingosine (Sph, a long-chain base) and a fatty acid (FA) (Fig. 1) and...

Keywords

Sialic Acid Sphingolipid Metabolism Brain Ganglioside Fatty Acyl Residue Exogenous Ganglioside 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Hakomori Si SI (2002) Inaugural article: the glycosynapse. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 99:225–232CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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See Also

  1. (2012) Antigen-presenting cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 209–210. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_321Google Scholar
  2. (2012) EGFR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1828Google Scholar
  3. (2012) FGFR3. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1394. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2166Google Scholar
  4. (2012) IL-12. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1807. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2959Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Knock-out mouse. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1957. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3239Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Microenvironment. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2296. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3720Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Monoclonal antibody therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2367–2368. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3823Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Sphingosine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3485. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5442Google Scholar
  9. (2012) VEGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3906. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6174Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Cancer and Immunology Research, Children’s Research Institute, Children’s National Medical Center and The George Washington University School of MedicineWashingtonUSA