Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Fragile Sites

  • Ryan L. Ragland
  • Thomas W. Glover
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_2262-3

Definition

Fragile sites are specific chromosomal loci that are especially prone to forming gaps and breaks on metaphase chromosomes under conditions of replication stress (Fig. 1).

Keywords

Metaphase Chromosome Fragile Site Replication Stress Common Fragile Site FHIT Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Arlt MF, Durkin SG, Ragland RL et al (2006) Common fragile sites as targets for chromosome rearrangements. DNA Repair (Amst) 5(9–10):1126–1135CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Durkin SG, Glover TW (2007) Chromosome fragile sites. Annu Rev Genet 41:169–192Google Scholar
  3. Iliopoulos D, Guler G, Han SY et al (2006) Roles of FHIT and WWOX fragile genes in cancer. Cancer Lett 232(1):27–36CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Richards RI (2001) Fragile and unstable chromosomes in cancer: causes and consequences. Trends Genet 17(6):339–345CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Sutherland GR (2003) Rare fragile sites. Cytogenet Genome Res 100(1–4):77–84CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Anticipation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 209. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_317Google Scholar
  2. (2012) ATR. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 302. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_443Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Chromatid. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 825. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1124Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Common fragile sites. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 960. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1278Google Scholar
  5. (2012) DNA flexibility. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1139. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1677Google Scholar
  6. (2012) FHIT. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1934. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2168Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Fragile-X syndrome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1454. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2263Google Scholar
  8. (2012) G2/M checkpoint. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1481. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2466Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Loss of heterozygosity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 2075-2076. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3415Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Orthologue. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2661. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4263Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Rare fragile sites. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3175. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4950Google Scholar
  12. (2012) RAD51. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3134. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4895Google Scholar
  13. (2012) seckel syndrome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3342. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5190Google Scholar
  14. (2012) Trinucleotide repeat. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3784. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5980Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Human GeneticsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA