Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Epigenomics

  • William Chi-Shing Cho
Living reference work entry

Latest version View entry history

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1950-5

Definition

Epigenomics is the comprehensive analyses of the entire epigenome using high-throughput technologies, including physical modifications, associations, and conformations of genomic DNA sequences. The complete set of the epigenetic landscape in a cell is known as epigenome, which is tissue specific, developmentally regulated, and highly dynamic. This variability offers a potential explanation for individual differences in phenotype. Aberrant epigenetic marks are associated with a range of complex pathologies, including cancer. The field of epigenomics involves chromatin, the three-dimensional complex of DNA, protein, and noncoding RNAs that determines the accessibility of DNA by the transcriptional machinery.

Characteristics

The Epigenome and Cancer

The term epigeneticswas first used by Prof. Conrad H. Waddington in 1942 as part of his model of how cell fates are established during development. It usually refers to reversible biochemical alterations of DNA and related...

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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Acetylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 17. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_24
  2. (2012) Biomarkers. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp. 408-409. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_6601
  3. (2012) Hypermethylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1784. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_2910
  4. (2012) Phosphorylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2870. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_4544
  5. (2012) Sumoylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3562. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_5572
  6. (2012) Transcription factor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3752. doi:  10.1007/978-3-642-16,483-5_5901

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical OncologyQueen Elizabeth HospitalKowloonHong Kong