Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

ALK Protein

  • Karen Pulford
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_179-5

Synonyms

Definition

Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) is a receptor tyrosine kinase with an essential role in early neural and muscle development. ALK phosphorylates intracellular molecules for the transduction of signals from the exterior of the cell to the nucleus. Aberrant expression of full-length ALK receptor protein has been reported in neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and glioblastoma while the presence of ALK fusion proteins in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) has resulted in the identification of the tumor entity ALK-positive ALCL. ALK fusion proteins have also been reported in ALK-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma DLBCL, a subset of non–small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and a variety of other tumors. ALK is a rare example of a receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic tumors.

Characteristics

The anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) gene (HUGO approved name anaplastic lymphoma...

Keywords

Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Gene Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase Receptor Tyrosine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Chiarle R, Martineo C, Mastini C et al (2008) The anaplastic lymphoma kinase is an effective oncoantigen for lymphoma vaccination. Nat Med 14:676–680CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Delsol G, Jaffe E, Falini B et al (2008) Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), ALK-positive. In: Swerdlow SH, Campo E, Harris NL et al (eds) WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues. International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, pp 312–316Google Scholar
  3. Duyster J, Bai RY, Morris SW (2001) Translocations involving anaplastic lymphoma kinase. Oncogene 20:5623–5637CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Hallberg B, Palmer RH (2013) Mechanistic insight into ALK receptor tyrosine kinase in human cancer biology. Nat Rev Cancer 10:685–700CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Janoueix-Lerosey I, Lequin D, Brugieres L et al (2009) Somatic and germline activating mutations of the ALK kinase receptor in neuroblastoma. Nature 455:967–970CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Pulford K (2014) ALK anaplastic lymphoma kinase. In: Gelman EP, Sawyers CL, Rauscher RJ III (eds) Molecular oncology – Causes of cancer and targets for treatment. Cambridge University Press, New York, pp 162–189Google Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) ALK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 128. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_178Google Scholar
  2. (2012) AML-1/ETO/CBFβ/TEL in chromosomal translocations. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 157. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_232Google Scholar
  3. (2012) CBP/p300. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 684. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_898Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Clathrin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 880. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1207Google Scholar
  5. (2012) CTL. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1012. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1406Google Scholar
  6. (2012) FOXO 3A. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1447. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2257Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Glioblastoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1554. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2421Google Scholar
  8. (2012) MSC. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2383. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3859Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2537. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4110Google Scholar
  10. (2012) NPM. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2565. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4133Google Scholar
  11. (2012) NPM-ALK. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2565–2566. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4134Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Tropomyosin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3785. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5991Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Nuffield Division of Clinical Laboratory SciencesUniversity of Oxford, John Radcliffe HospitalOxfordUK