Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Dormancy

  • Judah Folkman
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1709-3

Synonyms

Definition

Tumor dormancy describes human tumors with three characteristics:
  1. (i)

    Visible only under a microscope and, therefore, cannot be detected by conventional diagnostic imaging methods and may have an average diameter the size of a pinhead but range from 0.1 to ∼2 or 3 mm

     
  2. (ii)

    Usually do not expand or spread to other organs

     
  3. (iii)

    Usually asymptomatic and harmless but have the potential to resume growth and eventually to be fatal to their host

     

Characteristics

Virtually all adult humans have dormant cancers, as determined from autopsies of individuals who died of trauma (e.g., auto accidents), but who did not have a diagnosis of cancer during their lifetime. From these autopsies, pathologists report microscopic-sized cancers in different organs, often called carcinoma in situ. In women 40–50 years old, 39 % have dormant in situ carcinomas in their breasts (preneoplastic lesions), but only 1 out...

Keywords

Down Syndrome Angiogenic Switch Tumor Dormancy Collagen Xviii Angiogenic Phenotype 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Aquirre-Ghiso JA (2007) Models, mechanisms and clinical evidence for cancer dormancy. Nat Rev Cancer 7:834–846CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Finn OJ (2006) Human tumor antigens, immunosurveillance and cancer vaccines. Immunol Res 36:73–82CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Folkman J (2007) Angiogenesis: an organizing principle for drug discovery? Nat Rev Drug Discov 6:273–286CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Holmgren L, O’Reilly MS, Folkman J (1995) Dormancy of micrometastases: balanced proliferation and apoptosis in the presence of angiogenesis suppression. Nat Med 1:149–153CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Naumov GN, Folkman J (2007) Strategies to prolong the nonangiogenic dormant state of human cancer. In: Davis DW, Herbst RS, Abbruzzese JL (eds) Antiangiogenic cancer therapy. CRC Press, Boca Raton/London/New York, pp 3–22Google Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Angiostatin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 187. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_280Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Basement membrane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 349. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_537Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Biomarkers. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 408–409. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6601Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1058. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1501Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Down syndrome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1159. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6489Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Glioblastoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1554. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2421Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Interleukin-12. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1892. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3101Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Leukemia. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2005. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3322Google Scholar
  9. (2012) Nude mice. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2584. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4172Google Scholar
  10. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Transfection. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3757. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5912Google Scholar
  12. (2012) VEGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3906. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6174Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA