Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Diethylstilbestrol

  • Rosemarie A. Ungarelli
  • Carol L. Rosenberg
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1614-2

Synonyms

DES

Definition

Diethylstilbestrol is a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen with biological properties similar to endogenous estrogens such as estradiol-17-beta and estrone (Estradiol).

Characteristics

Pharmacology

Diethylstilbestrol is administered orally, is lipid-soluble, and readily absorbed from the proximal gastrointestinal tract. It is metabolized via the hepatic microsomal system to dienestrol and quinone and epoxide intermediates. It crosses the placenta and is thought to be metabolized by the fetus.

Initial Use and Early Epidemiologic Studies

Diethylstilbestrol (DES), first manufactured by Dodds and associates in London in 1938, was used to treat several gynecologic conditions. In particular, it was prescribed for the treatment of frequent or threatened miscarriages. As early as 1953, Dieckmann and colleagues demonstrated that DES did not improve pregnancy outcomes. (In fact, in a later reanalysis of these data in 1978, Brackbill and Berendes showed that women exposed to...

Keywords

Testicular Cancer Microsatellite Instability Allele Imbalance Unexposed Woman Threatened Miscarriage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Giusti RM, Iwamoto K, Hatch EE (1995) Diethylstilbestrol revisited: a review of the long-term health effects. Ann Int Med 122:778–788CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Larson PS, Ungarelli RA, De Las Morenas A et al (2006) In utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol (DES) does not increase genomic instability in normal or neoplastic breast epithelium. Cancer 107(9):2122–2126CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Newbold RR, Padilla-Banks E, Jefferson WN (2006) Adverse effects of the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol are transmitted to subsequent generations. Endocrinology 147(Suppl 6):S11–S17CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Schrager S, Potter BE (2004) Diethylstilbestrol exposure. Am Fam Physician 69:2395–2402PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Yager JD, Davidson NE (2006) Estrogen carcinogenesis in breast cancer. New Eng J Med 354:270–282CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Carcinogen. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 644. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_839Google Scholar
  2. (2012) DNA amplification. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1129. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1665Google Scholar
  3. (2012) DNA mismatch repair mechanism. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1140. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1684Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Estrogens. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1333. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2019Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Genetic instability. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1527-1528. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2380Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Boston Medical Center and Boston University School of MedicineBostonUSA