Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Diabody

  • Shuji Ozaki
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1603-3

Synonyms

Definition

Diabody is a noncovalent dimer of single-chain Fv (scFv) fragment that consists of the heavy-chain variable (VH) and light-chain variable (VL) regions connected by a small peptide linker. Another form of diabody is single-chain (Fv)2 in which two scFv fragments are covalently linked to each other.

Characteristics

Advances in antibody technology are enabling the design of antibody-based reagents for specific purposes in cancer diagnosis and monoclonal antibody therapy. First, to minimize the immunogenicity and enhance the efficacy in human use, mouse monoclonal antibodies are engineered to chimeric antibodies or humanized antibodies by grafting to the human constant region or framework. Moreover, fully human antibodies are developed by the use of transgenic mice (see Transgenic Mouse) or phage display technology. Second, monoclonal antibodies are designed as immunoconjugates to deliver the...

Keywords

Antibody Fragment Bispecific Antibody scFv Fragment Alternative Reagent Noncovalent Dimer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Batra SK, Jain M, Wittel UA et al (2002) Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of genetically engineered antibodies. Curr Opin Biotechnol 13:603–608CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Beckman RA, Weiner LM, Davis HM (2007) Antibody constructs in cancer therapy. Cancer 109:170–179CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Holliger P, Hudson PJ (2005) Engineered antibody fragments and the rise of single domains. Nat Biotechnol 23:1126–1136CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Jain M, Kamal N, Batra SK (2007) Engineering antibodies for clinical applications. Trends Biotechnol 25:307–316CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2009) Antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 188. doi: 0.1007/978-3-540-47648-1_313Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Chimeric antibodies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 806. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1091Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Cytokine. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1051. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1473Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Drug biodistribution. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1160. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1732Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Humanized antibodies. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1760. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2863Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Monoclonal antibody therapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2367–2368. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3823Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Pharmacokinetics. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2845. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4500Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of HematologyTokushima Prefectural Central HospitalTokushimaJapan