Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Decay-Accelerating Factor

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1542-2

Synonyms

Definition

Decay-accelerating factor (DAF) participates in the regulation of complement system activity by accelerating the decay of the C3/C5 convertase of the classic as well as of the alternative pathway. The highly polymorphic 50–100 kDa protein facilitates complement regulation by cysteine rich complement control protein repeats (CCP). Most of the DAF isoforms are linked to the cell membrane by a glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor following the CCPs.

Characteristics

DAF has been detected in all mammalians. Physiologically it is expressed in all cells contacting the complement system enclosing cells within the peripheral blood and epithelial as well as endothelial cells. Soluble DAF is detectable in plasma, tears, saliva, and urine, as well as in synovial and cerebrospinal fluids. Besides its function as a regulator of the complement system, DAF inhibits natural killer cells, is...

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Acute Myeloid Leukemia Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access

References

  1. Brandt B, Mikesch JH, Simon R et al (2005) Selective expression of a splice-variant of decay-accelerating factor (DAF) in c-erbB-2-positive mammary carcinoma cells showing increased transendothelial invasiveness. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 329:319–324CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fishelson Z, Donin N, Zell S et al (2003) Obstacles to cancer immunotherapy: expression of membrane complement regulatory proteins (mCRPs) in tumors. Mol Immunol 40:109–123CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Mikesch JH, Buerger H, Simon R et al (2006) Decay-accelerating factor (CD55): a versatile acting molecule in human malignancies. Biochim Biophys Acta 1766:42–52 (Review)PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Niehans GA, Cherwitz DL, Staley NA et al (1996) Human carcinomas variably express the complement inhibitory proteins CD46 (membrane cofactor protein), CD55 (decay-accelerating factor), and CD59 (protectin). Am J Pathol 149:129–142PubMedCentralPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Spendlove I, Li L, Carmichael C et al (1999) Decay accelerating factor (CD55): a target for cancer vaccines? Cancer Res 59:2282–2286PubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) BFGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 388. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_596Google Scholar
  2. (2012) EGF. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1211. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1824Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Glioma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1557. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2423Google Scholar
  4. (2012) IFN. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1806. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2949Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Interleukin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1892. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3094Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Medullary thyroid carcinoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 2199-2200. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3600Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Non-hodgkin lymphoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2537. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4110Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Renal cancer. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, pp 3225–3226. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6575Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Clinical ChemistryUniversity Medical Centre Schleswig-HolsteinKeilGermany