Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Cystatins

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1450-2

Synonyms

Definition

Cystatins were originally defined as endogenous inhibitors of thiol- or cysteine-proteases. Later, the discoveries of several proteins whose primary sequence revealed substantial homology to the typical cystatin domain led to the definition of a cystatin superfamily. With the identification of other types of intracellular cysteine-proteases, however, it became clear that cystatins inhibit mainly cysteine-proteases present in endosomes and lysosomes. Additionally, many of the newer members of the cystatin superfamily have less than 30 % homology to classical cystatins and do not inhibit lysosomal cysteine proteases. Moreover, several proteins with little apparent amino acid sequence homology fold into typical three-dimensional structures attributed to cystatins. Thus, the term “cystatins” now refers to a heterogeneous group of proteins still lacking both a uniform identity and a cohesive definition.

Characteristics

Domain...

Keywords

Cysteine Protease Lysosomal Cysteine Protease Lung Coloni Cystatin Superfamily Potential Chemokines 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Complement. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 963. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1284Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Cytokinesis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1055. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1477Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Extracellular Matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1362. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Immortalization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1811. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2969Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Inhibitors. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1864. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3055Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Lung Colony Formation Assay. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2115. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3436Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Lysosome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2128. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3472Google Scholar
  8. (2012) N- and O-Glycosylation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2447. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2459Google Scholar
  9. (2012) N- or C-Terminal Processing. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2447. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5733Google Scholar
  10. (2012) Neovascularization. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2474. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4016Google Scholar
  11. (2012) P53. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
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  16. (2012) Severe Combined Immunodeficient Mice. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3395. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5271Google Scholar
  17. (2012) Transfection. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3757. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5912Google Scholar
  18. (2012) Transformation. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 3757–3758. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5913Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biological Science, College of PharmacyTouro University-CAVallyoUSA