Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Aging

  • Cynthia C. Sprenger
  • Stephen R. Plymate
  • May J. Reed
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_143-2

Definition

Aging is defined at many levels, from the mitotic age of cells to the organismal-wide aging of tissues and organs. The appearance of cancer is only one clinical manifestation of the aging process. Age-associated epithelial cancers, such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer, however, contribute significantly to the morbidity and mortality of the elderly and are the second leading cause of death.

Characteristics

Aging

During an organism’s life span almost every aspect of its phenotype will undergo modification. The complexity of aging has led to a plethora of ideas about the specific molecular and cellular causes and how these alterations lead to age-associated diseases, such as epithelial cancers. Underlying all of these theories is the assumption that aging occurs from the bottom-up, beginning with damage to DNA and proteins and ending with organismal frailty, disability, and disease. There is a vast amount of evidence to support the following aging theories:...

Keywords

Senescent Cell Epithelial Cancer Tissue Architecture Cell Cycle Protein Epithelial Growth Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

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See Also

  1. (2012) Epithelial Growth Factors. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1292. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1960Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Extracellular Matrix. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1362. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2067Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Growth Factor. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1607–1608. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2520Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Growth Factor Receptors. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1608. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2521Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Inflammatory Cytokines. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1858. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3047Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Integrin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1884. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3084Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Laminin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp 1971–1972. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3268Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Microenvironment. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2296. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3720Google Scholar
  9. (2012) P53 In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2747. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4331Google Scholar
  10. (2012) PRb In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2967. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4708Google Scholar
  11. (2012) Reactive Stroma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3193. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4968Google Scholar
  12. (2012) Senescence. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3370. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5236Google Scholar
  13. (2012) Somatic Cells. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3466. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5408Google Scholar
  14. (2012) Somatic Tissue. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3467. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5413Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia C. Sprenger
    • 1
  • Stephen R. Plymate
    • 1
  • May J. Reed
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of Gerontology and Geriatric MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA