Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Aggressive Fibromatosis in Children

  • Marry M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_142-2

Synonyms

Definition

Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a rare soft tissue tumor and rare in childhood with high potential for local invasiveness and recurrence. Primary surgery with negative margins is the most successful primary treatment modality for children with AF. Positive resection margins after surgery indicate a high risk for relapse. Multicenter prospective (randomized) trials are necessary to clarify the role of and best strategy for treatment in pediatric AF after incomplete surgery. For this purpose, chemotherapy or alternatively radiotherapy can be considered, each with its own potential side effects in consequence.

Characteristics

Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) (Supportive care) is a soft tissue tumor, which arises principally from the connective tissue of muscle and the overlying fascia (aponeurosis). The previously most used synonym is desmoid tumor. The histological pattern is characterized by elongated fibroblast-like cells....

Keywords

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Positive Margin Soft Tissue Tumor Desmoid Tumor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Buitendijk S, van de Ven CP, Dumans TG et al (2005) Pediatric aggressive fibromatosis, a retrospective analysis of 13 cases and a review of the literature. Cancer 104:1090–1099CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Skapek SX, Hawk BJ, Hoffer FA et al (1998) Combination chemotherapy using vinblastine and methotrexate for the treatment of progressive desmoid tumor in children. J Clin Oncol 16:3021–3027PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Spiegel DA, Dormans JP, Meyer JS et al (1999) Aggressive fibromatosis from infancy to adolescence. J Pediatr Orthop 19:776–784PubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Chromosome. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 848. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1145Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Familial adenomatous polyposis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 1373. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2106Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Negative resection margins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2469. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4000Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Osteoma. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 2663. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4282Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Radiotherapy. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3158. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4926Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Recurrence. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3208. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4998Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Surgery. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer, Berlin/Heidelberg, p 3574. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5596Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Pediatric Oncology/HematologyErasmusMC-Sophia Children’s HospitalRotterdamThe Netherlands