Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

Cryosurgery

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_1391-3

Synonyms

Definition

Operative cutting of tissue or the targeted destruction of pathological tissue by induced cold necrosis at temperatures down to −196 °C.

Characteristics

Cryobiology

Cryobiology deals with the physical effects of low temperatures and the changing of temperatures in living tissues. The state or phase (vapor, liquid, or solid) of water depends on temperature, pressure, and volume. The liquid and solid phase of pure water are in equilibrium at atmospheric pressure and 0 °C. By increasing the pressure, this temperature (0 °C) or freezing point can be lowered. This phenomenon is known as supercooling.

When its temperature is lowered, water will show vitrification or crystallization. Very rapid cooling of pure water will induce vitrification that entails the formation of amorphous, transparent, glasslike structures rather than crystals. Crystallization requires initiating nuclei, for instance, an insoluble crystalline impurity). Slow cooling...

Keywords

Bone Tumor Giant Cell Tumor Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Vascular Stasis Slow Freezing Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Enneking WF, Dunham W, Gebhart MC (1993) A system for the functional evaluation of reconstructive procedures after surgical treatment of tumours of the musculoskeletal system. Clin Orthop Relat Res 286:241–246PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Gage A, Baust J (1998) Mechanisms of tissue injury in cryosurgery. Cryobiology 37(3):171–186CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Robinson D, Halperin N, Nevo Z (2001) Two freezing cycles ensure interface sterilization by cryosurgery during bone tumour resection. Cryobiology 43:4–10CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Schreuder HWB (2001) Cryosurgery for bone tumors. In: Korpan NN (ed) Basics of cryosurgery. Springer, Wien, pp 231–253CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Veth R, Schreuder B, van Beem H et al (2005) Cryosurgery in aggressive benign and low-grade malignant bone tumours. Lancet Oncol 6(1):25–34CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Epiphysis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1291. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1952Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Extralesional excision. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1366. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_2073Google Scholar
  3. (2012) Intralesional excision. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1900. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3122Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Marginal excision. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2168. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3538Google Scholar
  5. (2012) MSTS functional Evaluation System. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2383. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3865Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Osteosynthesis. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2670. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_4290Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Wide excision. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3947. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6246Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OrthopaedicsRadboud University Medical CentreNijmegenThe Netherlands