Encyclopedia of Cancer

Living Edition
| Editors: Manfred Schwab

ABC-Transporters

Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-27841-9_13-5

Synonyms

Definition

ABC (ATP-binding cassette)-transporters are membrane-embedded proteins with a characteristic ABC domain that utilize the energy from ATP hydrolysis for the transport of their substrates across a cellular membrane.

Characteristics

The superfamily of ABC-transporters comprises one of the most abundant protein families in nature. These transporters are believed to date back in evolutionary time more than 3 billion years and are distributed in all three kingdoms of living organisms, archaea, eubacteria, and eukaryotes. Archaea are a unique group of microorganisms classified as bacteria (Archaeobacteria) but genetically and metabolically different from all other known bacteria. They appear to be living fossils, the survivors of an ancient group of organisms that bridged the gap in evolution between bacteria and the eukaryotes.

ABC-transporters have to be distinguished from ABC-proteins....

Keywords

Cystic Fibrosis Vinca Alkaloid Amino Acid Consensus Sequence Multidrug Resistance Transporter Anticancer Drug Target 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.
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References

  1. Gottesman MM, Fojo T, Bates SE (2002) Multidrug resistance in cancer: role of ATP-dependent transporters. Nat Rev Cancer 2:48–58CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Higgins CF (1993) ABC transporters: from microorganisms to man. Annu Rev Cell Biol 8:7–113Google Scholar
  3. Holland IB, Cole SPC, Kuchler K, Higgins CF (eds) (2003) ABC proteins from bacteria to man. Academic Press, an Imprint of Elsevier Science, London/San DiegoGoogle Scholar
  4. Lage H (2003) ABC-transporters: implications on drug resistance from microorganisms to human cancers. Int J Antimicrob Agents 22:188–199CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

See Also

  1. (2012) Antimetabolite. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 216. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_326Google Scholar
  2. (2012) Ciclosporin. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 857. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1167Google Scholar
  3. (2012) DNA Repair. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1141. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1687Google Scholar
  4. (2012) Epipodophyllotoxins. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 1291. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_1953Google Scholar
  5. (2012) Multidrug Resistance. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 2393. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_3887Google Scholar
  6. (2012) Taxane. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3614. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_5689Google Scholar
  7. (2012) Verapamil. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3906. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6179Google Scholar
  8. (2012) Vinca Alkaloids. In: Schwab M (ed) Encyclopedia of Cancer, 3rd edn. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, p 3908. doi: 10.1007/978-3-642-16483-5_6187Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of PathologyCharité Campus MitteBerlinGermany